Report: Circulate San Diego Releases New Report on the City of San Diego's Parking Rules

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Circulate San Diego has just released our new report on how the City of San Diego's parking rules are barriers to Transit Oriented Development (TOD). Read the whole report here.

Executive Summary

The parking rules in the City of San Diego are generally collected in the Municipal Code, not in individual community plan documents. This presents an opportunity for parking policy to become streamlined, and comprehensive in its approach. However, current parking rules in San Diego lack cohesion.

Parking policy in San Diego is complex, inconsistent, and difficult for developers to navigate. The parking code represents a hodgepodge of different policies, layered on top of one another over time, reflect a variety of sometimes conflicting and shifting policy goals. In some circumstances, parking minimums for new developments are reduced because of lower expected or demonstrated demand. More frequently, parking minimums are increased, on the assumption that certain areas need added parking, or perhaps more cynically, to keep new developments from coming to those neighborhoods at all. 

“For almost every new home constructed in San Diego, at least one new parking space is required to be built.”

For almost every new home constructed in San Diego, at least one new parking space is required to be built. This is true for even studio apartments and other homes well served by transit. San Diego’s parking rules assume every resident will drive for all of their trips. These rules are inconsistent with reality, where many San Diegans do not own a car, or would like to live without having to own a car and pay rent for car storage in the form of a reserved parking spot.

Parking minimums for new developments are generally intended to reduce the impact of a new building to the neighborhood, by limiting the number of new neighbors that use limited street parking. However, parking requirements for new developments have a variety of unintended consequences, famously identified as the “High Cost of Free Parking,” by Professor Donald Shoup, including the tendency to encourage traffic and drive up development costs and rents for end users.

While parking minimums may serve important purposes in some circumstances, parking minimums that are too high can hurt neighborhoods and limit the ability to achieve smart growth goals. The City of San Diego should examine parking reforms that will allow the City to meet its Climate Action Plan goals, and implement the General Plan’s City of Villages Strategy.

Key Findings

  • Requests to lower parking requirements are burdensome and time-consuming.
  • Reduction in parking minimums for areas near transit are minimal and limited.
  • Assumption that all future residents will drive will not support mode share goals in the Climate Action Plan.

Read the entire report here [PDF] - [HTML]


San Diego Announces Climate Action Plan Implementation

San Diego  Mayor Kevin Faulconer released a report on how the City will implement the first year of its Climate Action Plan. The report details expenditures of nearly $130 million to reduce green house gas emissions through a series of actions focused on transportation, housing, energy, and water. Circulate's Executive Director Jim Stone spoke at the press conference, stating "The Climate Action Plan not only sets a course for San Diego, it serves as an example for cities around the nation. The Mayor's proposal today is a welcomed down payment on a robust implementation to demonstrate our City's continued leadership to protect our climate and our quality of life."

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Letter: Revise Proposed Ridesharing Decision to Promote Clean Vehicle Use

Circulate San Diego joined with a number of environmental and transportation advocacy organizations from around California to sign onto a letter to support the revision of the Phase II Ridesharing Proposed Decision to allow transportation network company (TNC) drivers to use vehicles obtained through rentals or short-term leases. The current proposal requires that TNC drivers own or lease their vehicles for terms longer than four months, the consequence of which would be to remove hundreds of TNC electric vehicles currently in service and eliminate a promising strategy for increasing electric vehicle (EV) deployment, especially in disadvantaged communities.

Read the entire letter [PDF]

Watch The Future of Transporation video here.


Circulator- April 22nd


Letter: Smart Transportation Solutions Beyond Car Storage for UC San Diego

UC San Diego is currently soliciting input from the campus community regarding transportation and parking policy.

Students, staff, and faculty can make their voices heard by accessing IdeaWave with their UC San Diego email address through April 18, 2016. Supporters for smart transportation choices can let the administration know they support more access to campus for transit, walking, and bicycling.

Circulate San Diego submitted a detailed comment letter, outlining a variety of ways UC San Diego can improve access to the campus, without relying only on more expensive car storage and added traffic. 

You can read a full copy of our letter here [PDF]


Letter: Upgrading the Compass Card and fare payment systems for MTS

As a part of our continuing campaign to fix the Compass Card, Circulate San Diego sent a letter today to the MTS board.

We are heartened to see that MTS has taken immediate action to apply for a grant to fund an upgrade to address PCI compliance for the Compass Card, and to hold a hearing to update the public on the Compass Card at the MTS April board meeting. We are pleased to submit this letter with suggestions regarding how MTS can enhance fare payment systems for our region’s transit systems.

Read the complete letter here [PDF].


Circulator- April 8th

MOVE Alliance Certifies Two Urban Infill Projects in East County
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Developments will increase mobility and amenities in El Cajon and La Mesa

SAN DIEGO (March 21., 2016)-­‐-­‐-­The MOVE Alliance is pleased to announce the certification of two urban infill projects in the cities of El Cajon and La Mesa. Both are infill, smart growth projects which will improve the pedestrian streetscape environment and are near high-quality transit.

“These projects demonstrate the potential for turning an under-utilized lot into compact, affordable housing that encourage residents to take transit and ride bikes rather than to use other vehicles,” said Jim Stone, Executive Director of Circulate San Diego, the parent organization of MOVE Alliance.

Read the full press release here

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The Power of Safe Street Design

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After three years of advocating for new crosswalks on Sixth Avenue, the residents of Bankers Hill are going to see success.  And it’s clear their success is all of our success.

Gary Pence, Senior Traffic Engineer for the City of San Diego, presented the new crosswalk plans at Tuesday’s Uptown Planners meeting, and was greeted with resounding approval from the audience and Board. For the approximate ½ mile section of Sixth Avenue between Laurel and Elm Streets, the City will install two new crosswalks accompanied by solar powered flashing lights, a road diet, and new buffered bike lanes.

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Press Release: MOVE Alliance Certifies Two Urban Infill Projects in East County

For Immediate Release:

Contact: Colin Parent
(619) 544-9255 ext. 310

MOVE Alliance Certifies Two Urban Infill Projects in East County

Developments will increase mobility and amenities in El Cajon and La Mesa

SAN DIEGO (March 21, 2016)-­‐-­‐-­The MOVE Alliance is pleased to announce the certification of two urban infill projects in the cities of El Cajon and La Mesa. Both are infill, smart growth projects which will improve the pedestrian streetscape environment and are near high-quality transit.

Read more

Letter: Support California Transportation Plan 2040

Circulate San Diego joined with a number of environmental and transportation advocacy organizations from around California to sign onto a letter to support the California Transportation Plan 2040, developed by CalTrans which aligns with the organizations' missions to create healthy, sustainable, and equitable communities with a variety of safe convenient and affordable transportation options.

Read the entire letter [PDF]

 



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