White Paper: Anatomy of Ballot Measure – Analysis of the Transit Elements in SANDAG’s Proposed 2016 Ballot Measure Expenditure Plans

Cover_Page.pngToday, Circulate San Diego is releasing a white paper analyzing the evolution of the transit and active transportation components of SANDAG's potential 2016 ballot measure.

This analysis was generated initially for internal purposes by Circulate San Diego staff and volunteers. The purpose of this memorandum is not for Circulate San Diego to speak in favor or against any ballot funding scenario. Instead, by publishing this information, it is our hope this analysis will help inform decisionmakers, advocates, the public, and the press. We aim to help develop a more broad understanding of SANDAG’s processes, priorities, and constraints.

Released with this document is an electronic appendix, which compares each of the various ballot expenditure plans side by side. Circulate San Diego also calculated the expected service dates for the various transit projects in each expenditure plan, based on the data SANDAG released.

Read the entire white paper here.

Access the electronic appendix here.


Letter: Recommendations for Vision Zero Strategic Plan

Circulate San Diego, in collaboration with a number of organizations and companies, sent a letter to the City of San Diego pertaining to the Vision Zero One Year Strategic Plan. 

In the letter, Circulate stresses the significant progress the City has made towards the Vision Zero initiative, yet also highlights significant shortcomings.  For example, there are no specific infrastructure projects listed for implementation in FY 2017, even though the Mayor's proposed FY 2017 budget includes valuable projects relevant to Vision Zero.  Further, Circulate specifies nine recommended actions the City could take to enhance the progress already underway. 

For a list of the nine recommended actions and more information, Download the full letter here.


Report: Circulate San Diego Releases New Report on the City of San Diego's Parking Rules

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Circulate San Diego has just released our new report on how the City of San Diego's parking rules are barriers to Transit Oriented Development (TOD). Read the whole report here.

Executive Summary

The parking rules in the City of San Diego are generally collected in the Municipal Code, not in individual community plan documents. This presents an opportunity for parking policy to become streamlined, and comprehensive in its approach. However, current parking rules in San Diego lack cohesion.

Parking policy in San Diego is complex, inconsistent, and difficult for developers to navigate. The parking code represents a hodgepodge of different policies, layered on top of one another over time, reflect a variety of sometimes conflicting and shifting policy goals. In some circumstances, parking minimums for new developments are reduced because of lower expected or demonstrated demand. More frequently, parking minimums are increased, on the assumption that certain areas need added parking, or perhaps more cynically, to keep new developments from coming to those neighborhoods at all. 

“For almost every new home constructed in San Diego, at least one new parking space is required to be built.”

For almost every new home constructed in San Diego, at least one new parking space is required to be built. This is true for even studio apartments and other homes well served by transit. San Diego’s parking rules assume every resident will drive for all of their trips. These rules are inconsistent with reality, where many San Diegans do not own a car, or would like to live without having to own a car and pay rent for car storage in the form of a reserved parking spot.

Parking minimums for new developments are generally intended to reduce the impact of a new building to the neighborhood, by limiting the number of new neighbors that use limited street parking. However, parking requirements for new developments have a variety of unintended consequences, famously identified as the “High Cost of Free Parking,” by Professor Donald Shoup, including the tendency to encourage traffic and drive up development costs and rents for end users.

While parking minimums may serve important purposes in some circumstances, parking minimums that are too high can hurt neighborhoods and limit the ability to achieve smart growth goals. The City of San Diego should examine parking reforms that will allow the City to meet its Climate Action Plan goals, and implement the General Plan’s City of Villages Strategy.

Key Findings

  • Requests to lower parking requirements are burdensome and time-consuming.
  • Reduction in parking minimums for areas near transit are minimal and limited.
  • Assumption that all future residents will drive will not support mode share goals in the Climate Action Plan.

Read the entire report here [PDF] - [HTML]


Letter: Revise Proposed Ridesharing Decision to Promote Clean Vehicle Use

Circulate San Diego joined with a number of environmental and transportation advocacy organizations from around California to sign onto a letter to support the revision of the Phase II Ridesharing Proposed Decision to allow transportation network company (TNC) drivers to use vehicles obtained through rentals or short-term leases. The current proposal requires that TNC drivers own or lease their vehicles for terms longer than four months, the consequence of which would be to remove hundreds of TNC electric vehicles currently in service and eliminate a promising strategy for increasing electric vehicle (EV) deployment, especially in disadvantaged communities.

Read the entire letter [PDF]

Watch The Future of Transporation video here.


Letter: Smart Transportation Solutions Beyond Car Storage for UC San Diego

UC San Diego is currently soliciting input from the campus community regarding transportation and parking policy.

Students, staff, and faculty can make their voices heard by accessing IdeaWave with their UC San Diego email address through April 18, 2016. Supporters for smart transportation choices can let the administration know they support more access to campus for transit, walking, and bicycling.

Circulate San Diego submitted a detailed comment letter, outlining a variety of ways UC San Diego can improve access to the campus, without relying only on more expensive car storage and added traffic. 

You can read a full copy of our letter here [PDF]


Letter: Upgrading the Compass Card and fare payment systems for MTS

As a part of our continuing campaign to fix the Compass Card, Circulate San Diego sent a letter today to the MTS board.

We are heartened to see that MTS has taken immediate action to apply for a grant to fund an upgrade to address PCI compliance for the Compass Card, and to hold a hearing to update the public on the Compass Card at the MTS April board meeting. We are pleased to submit this letter with suggestions regarding how MTS can enhance fare payment systems for our region’s transit systems.

Read the complete letter here [PDF].


Letter: Support California Transportation Plan 2040

Circulate San Diego joined with a number of environmental and transportation advocacy organizations from around California to sign onto a letter to support the California Transportation Plan 2040, developed by CalTrans which aligns with the organizations' missions to create healthy, sustainable, and equitable communities with a variety of safe convenient and affordable transportation options.

Read the entire letter [PDF]

 


Policy Letter: Initial Letter to CAP Implementation Working Group

Circulate San Diego shared a letter with the CAP Implementation Working Group with initial recommendations to implement the land use and transportation elements of the City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan. [PDF]


Policy Letter: SUPPORT for Updates to CEQA Guidelines on Evaluating Transportation Impacts

Circulate San Diego joined with a number of public health, environmental, housing, and transportation advocacy organizations from around California to sign onto a letter to support recommendations for the Updates to the CEQA Guidelines on Evaluating Transportation Impacts, which seeks to implement SB 743 successfully.  

Read the entire letter [PDF]


Letter: Support Downtown Mobility, Protected Bike Lanes

Today, Circulate San Diego sent the below letter to Civic San Diego to support the proposed Downtown Mobility Plan which will bring the first protected bike lanes to downtown and provide a network of greenways and bikeways to complement the existing transit services.

A PDF version of the letter is available here.



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