Letter: Floor Alert - Support AB 2763

There is a Floor Alert for AB 2763 for August 1, 2016. Circulate San Diego joined with a number of organizations and companies from around California to support AB 2763 which clarifies that drivers can use leased or rented vehicles while driving with a Transportation Network Company (TNC). 

Please join us in support of AB 2763.

Read the entire letter [PDF]


Letter: Amendments to strengthen commitments to transit in SANDAG’s 2016 ballot measure

Circulate wrote a letter to provide final recommendations for how to provide certainty for advancing transit in SANDAG’s proposed 2016 ballot measure. Circulate San Diego is willing to support a ballot measure that commits to building priority transit projects in a reasonable time frame of 15 years.

Read our full letter here [PDF].


Letter: Coalition of Supporters for Affordable Homes Bonus Program

Circulate San Diego organized a coalition of affordable housing advocates, market-rate developers, REALTORS, business groups, and climate change activists to support the proposed update to the City of San Diego's Affordable Homes Bonus Program. We submitted this joint support letter to City decision-makers. [PDF]

As reported by KPBS, the proposal was adopted unanimously by the City Council, and it will provide a variety of benefits to projects that incorporate affordable homes. 

Additional Backup Information:

Initial Working Group proposal for Affordable Homes Bonus Program update [PDF]

Current production numbers for State Density Bonus in San Diego as of 2016, based on figures from the San Diego Housing Commission [PDF]


Letter: Commitments to advancing transit in SANDAG’s 2016 ballot measure

Circulate San Diego issued a letter with recommendations for how to provide certainty for advancing transit in SANDAG’s proposed 2016 ballot measure. We believe that the measure can be further improved by providing a reasonable time frame to complete the remaining transit projects listed in the measure’s Priority Corridors program.

To read Circulate's letter, download the PDF version here: [PDF]


Letter: Status Update on the Transit and Active Transportation Components to SANDAG’s Proposed 2016 Ballot Measure

Circulate San Diego staff prepared this memorandum for our board to discuss the status of SANDAG's proposed 2016 ballot measure, as it relates to transit and active transportation.

The short summary is that the measure has substantial new money for transit and active transportation, and the commitments to advance transit are meaningful, though possibly not sufficient. Read the entire memorandum here. [PDF]


Letter: Support AB 2763

Circulate San Diego joined with a number of organizations and companies from around California to support AB 2763 which clarifies that drivers can use leased or rented vehicles while driving with a Transportation Network Company (TNC). 

To read the entire letter, click here: [PDF]


Letter: Support for Governor Brown’s Housing Legislation in the 2016-17 May Revision

Circulate San Diego strongly supports the housing legislation proposed and supported in Governor Brown’s 2016-17 May Revision.

In addition to the Governor’s proposed trailer bill, we also support SB 1069, AB 2299, and AB 2501.

We recommend, however, that the trailer bill be amended to ensure that it more clearly helps implement State Density Bonus Law.  Details are in our letter, available here [PDF].


White Paper: Anatomy of Ballot Measure – Analysis of the Transit Elements in SANDAG’s Proposed 2016 Ballot Measure Expenditure Plans

Cover_Page.pngToday, Circulate San Diego is releasing a white paper analyzing the evolution of the transit and active transportation components of SANDAG's potential 2016 ballot measure.

This analysis was generated initially for internal purposes by Circulate San Diego staff and volunteers. The purpose of this memorandum is not for Circulate San Diego to speak in favor or against any ballot funding scenario. Instead, by publishing this information, it is our hope this analysis will help inform decisionmakers, advocates, the public, and the press. We aim to help develop a more broad understanding of SANDAG’s processes, priorities, and constraints.

Released with this document is an electronic appendix, which compares each of the various ballot expenditure plans side by side. Circulate San Diego also calculated the expected service dates for the various transit projects in each expenditure plan, based on the data SANDAG released.

Read the entire white paper here.

Access the electronic appendix here.


Letter: Recommendations for Vision Zero Strategic Plan

Circulate San Diego, in collaboration with a number of organizations and companies, sent a letter to the City of San Diego pertaining to the Vision Zero One Year Strategic Plan. 

In the letter, Circulate stresses the significant progress the City has made towards the Vision Zero initiative, yet also highlights significant shortcomings.  For example, there are no specific infrastructure projects listed for implementation in FY 2017, even though the Mayor's proposed FY 2017 budget includes valuable projects relevant to Vision Zero.  Further, Circulate specifies nine recommended actions the City could take to enhance the progress already underway. 

For a list of the nine recommended actions and more information, Download the full letter here.


Report: Circulate San Diego Releases New Report on the City of San Diego's Parking Rules

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Circulate San Diego has just released our new report on how the City of San Diego's parking rules are barriers to Transit Oriented Development (TOD). Read the whole report here.

Executive Summary

The parking rules in the City of San Diego are generally collected in the Municipal Code, not in individual community plan documents. This presents an opportunity for parking policy to become streamlined, and comprehensive in its approach. However, current parking rules in San Diego lack cohesion.

Parking policy in San Diego is complex, inconsistent, and difficult for developers to navigate. The parking code represents a hodgepodge of different policies, layered on top of one another over time, reflect a variety of sometimes conflicting and shifting policy goals. In some circumstances, parking minimums for new developments are reduced because of lower expected or demonstrated demand. More frequently, parking minimums are increased, on the assumption that certain areas need added parking, or perhaps more cynically, to keep new developments from coming to those neighborhoods at all. 

“For almost every new home constructed in San Diego, at least one new parking space is required to be built.”

For almost every new home constructed in San Diego, at least one new parking space is required to be built. This is true for even studio apartments and other homes well served by transit. San Diego’s parking rules assume every resident will drive for all of their trips. These rules are inconsistent with reality, where many San Diegans do not own a car, or would like to live without having to own a car and pay rent for car storage in the form of a reserved parking spot.

Parking minimums for new developments are generally intended to reduce the impact of a new building to the neighborhood, by limiting the number of new neighbors that use limited street parking. However, parking requirements for new developments have a variety of unintended consequences, famously identified as the “High Cost of Free Parking,” by Professor Donald Shoup, including the tendency to encourage traffic and drive up development costs and rents for end users.

While parking minimums may serve important purposes in some circumstances, parking minimums that are too high can hurt neighborhoods and limit the ability to achieve smart growth goals. The City of San Diego should examine parking reforms that will allow the City to meet its Climate Action Plan goals, and implement the General Plan’s City of Villages Strategy.

Key Findings

  • Requests to lower parking requirements are burdensome and time-consuming.
  • Reduction in parking minimums for areas near transit are minimal and limited.
  • Assumption that all future residents will drive will not support mode share goals in the Climate Action Plan.

Read the entire report here [PDF] - [HTML]



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